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1101
Signatures of Passengers from the Mortonhouse, 23 Aug 1728
Signatures of Passengers from the Mortonhouse, 23 Aug 1728
 
 
1102
Signatures of passengers on the Virtuous Grace
Signatures of passengers on the Virtuous Grace
Antoni/Anthony Rüger and his sons Antoni/Anthony and Bürghart Rüger 
 
1103
Single headstone for Thomas LeGate Jr., his wife Mary Morris, their daughter Elizabeth, Thomas' second wife Deborah Shepard; Thomas LeGate III and his wife Deborah Vose, and their infant children Charles, Henry and Henry.
Single headstone for Thomas LeGate Jr., his wife Mary Morris, their daughter Elizabeth, Thomas' second wife Deborah Shepard; Thomas LeGate III and his wife Deborah Vose, and their infant children Charles, Henry and Henry.
Located in Pine Grove Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester, Massachusetts Plot Q-17.
Photo courtesy Barbara/Bonnie 
 
1104
Slave House at Sunnyside, in Critz, Virginia
Slave House at Sunnyside, in Critz, Virginia
John N. Zentmeyer owned five slaves in the 1850 Census and six in the 1860 Census.
Image by Gary Zentmyer  
 
1105
Soil Survey of the Columbia Basin, Washington
Soil Survey of the Columbia Basin, Washington
One of approximately twenty books authored by Arthur Thomas Strahorn 
 
1106
Soldier's Monument near Warrior's Mark, Pennsylvania
Soldier's Monument near Warrior's Mark, Pennsylvania
Erected in the old Methodist Cemetery near the village of Warrior's Mark in 1878 by surviving Civil War veterans, in honor of soldiers from Franklin and Warrior's Mark townships killed in the war, including the Zentmyer brothers. 
 
1107
Some facts about Daniel Zentmyer
Some facts about Daniel Zentmyer
History of Guthrie and Adair Counties, Iowa 1884
History of Guthrie County
Highland Township 
 
1108
Some views from Hobart Mills
Some views from Hobart Mills
 
 
1109
Someone was trying to contact Joseph in New York in 1839 . . .
Someone was trying to contact Joseph in New York in 1839 . . .
. . . which was where his ship was headed when he left Germany via Le Havre. This could have been about his inheritance, which he was at risk of forfeiting. From the New York Post, 10 Jun 1839 
 
1110
Springfield Furnace
Springfield Furnace
Since John and Margaret lived at Springfield Furnace, John likely worked in iron production there, a business he would continue to be involved with throughout his life.
Image by Gary Zentmyer 
 
1111
Springfield Furnace today
Springfield Furnace today
The actual blast furnace is all that remains of the iron ore operation, although the Royer Mansion is intact and is now owned by the Blair County Historical Society.
Image by Gary Zentmyer 
 
1112
Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania
Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania
Miles Zentmyer's birthplace is listed as Spruce Creek, although at the time the family was living a short distance away on a farm owned by the Huntingdon Furnace Co.
Image by Gary Zentmyer 
 
1113
St. Paul's P.E. Church, Philadelphia
St. Paul's P.E. Church, Philadelphia
Now the Episcopal Community Services of the Diocese of Pennsylvania
Image courtesy Gary Zentmyer 
 
1114
Stephen Rowley & Fanny Ethel Santmyer
Stephen Rowley & Fanny Ethel Santmyer
1959, Ingram, Allegheny
Photo courtesy of Scott Fitzsimmons 
 
1115
Strahorn Mausoleum
Strahorn Mausoleum
This mausoleum was built by Robert E. Strahorn and contains the remains of Robert and his two wives, Carrie Adell Green and Ruby Shannon Garland. It is located in Riverside Memorial Park on the western edge of Spokane. 
 
1116
Strahorn Mausoleum, Oak Woods Cemetery
Strahorn Mausoleum, Oak Woods Cemetery
Built in 1883, the mausoleum hold the remains of Robert Strahorn and his wife Juliet Murdock. It is located on Memorial Drive near the southern end of the Lake of Memories. 
 
1117
Strahorn Pines - Spokane
Strahorn Pines - Spokane
Constructed in 1887, this home was built and occupied by J.J. Browne, the developer of Browne's Addition, Spokane's premier neighborhood at the time. The home sat atop a bluff with panoramic views of the Spokane River. In 1900 the home was purchased by Robert and Carrie Strahorn. The three-story building was then completely remodeled by noted architect Kirtland Cutter into a twenty-room mansion with nine bathrooms and ten fireplaces. The first house in Spokane with steam heat, Strahorn Pines was also said to have featured a bowling alley. The house was purchased by the Eastern Washington Historical Society in 1970 and demolished in 1974 to make way for a new museum building.  
 
1118
Strahorn Residence, Kenwood Illinois
Strahorn Residence, Kenwood Illinois
House and barn shown, built in 1887, the architect was Burnham and Root. It was located at the southwest corner of Greenwood & 47th in Kenwood, a Chicago suburb on Lake Michigan. 
 
1119
Strahorn Wedding 1888
Strahorn Wedding 1888
 
 
1120
Strahorn's Mill Covered Bridge
Strahorn's Mill Covered Bridge
Also known later as the Foxcatcher Farms Bridge, after the Strahorn Mill property was acquired by William du Pont and combined with his Foxcatcher Farms properties. (William's son John was the subject of the movie Foxcatcher) This is one of only two remaining historic covered bridges in Cecil County, Maryland. An advertisement for bids to build a bridge near Strahorn's Mill appeared in both the Cecil Democrat and Cecil Whig on June 9, 1860. The contract called for a bridge over Big Elk Creek, "covered and to span 65 feet and have a width of 16 feet, out to out." Ten days later the contract was awarded to Ferdinand Wood for a cost of $1,165 and it called for the bridge to be built on the "Old Burr plan." (the curving trusses were called Burr trusses) It is likely the bridge was completed by the end of the year or very early in 1861. The bridge is located in Fair Hill where Tawes Dr. crosses Big Elk Creek. 
 
1121
Strahorn's Mill on Big Elk Creek in 1898
Strahorn's Mill on Big Elk Creek in 1898
At various times the building had been a wollen mill, nail factory, grist mill, turning mill, and a tanbark yard before Jonathan Strahorn converted it to a sawmill, later passing it on to his sons Thomas and Albert. The 1880 Census of Manufacturers showed 'A. Strahorn and Bro.' doing their own logging and operating the sawmill which represented $5,000 in capital investment, had four employees, and three saws - a circular, muley, and band saw. A 9.5-foot waterfall drove two 27-inch turbines which developed 22 horsepower. Annual output was 100,000 board feet, or about $2,000. The 61 acre farm, house, and mill went into receivership and were purchased at auction in 1888 by Albert and Thomas' younger brother Edward Hicks Strahorn and the property eventually went to Edward's sons Isaac and Harry. It was one of the properties purchased by William du Pont in 1927, and was finally sold to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in 1975.
 
 
1122
Strahorn, Pierson & Co. Spoke and Wheel Factory, Toughkenamon,Chester County, Pennsylvania
Strahorn, Pierson & Co. Spoke and Wheel Factory, Toughkenamon,Chester County, Pennsylvania
After a fire destroyed his factory in 1864, Samuel Strahorn decided to relocate. With the advent of steam power, factory owners were no longer limited to operating near rivers and streams. Strahorn learned that the route of the Philadelphia and Baltimore Central Railroad would pass through the crossroads later to be known as Toughkenamon, affording ready access to rail shipping. The new partnership of Strahorn, Pierson and Company opened at Toughkenamon in the spring of 1866 after purchasing a factory there. Samuel Strahorn died in November 1867 of "Typhomalarial Fever" which periodically swept through the Toughkenamon Valley. It appears that his wife retained the partnership interest, and a few years later their sons Joseph H. and Milton Strahorn were listed in the business. The factory was three stories high and some fifteen to twenty men were employed there, turning out 40,000 spokes, 1,200 sets of wheels, and a large number of hubs and other items each year. Machinery was driven by a twenty horsepower Corliss steam engine. Through the years, the capacity for finishing spokes increased to seven or eight hundred per day. The partnership was dissolved in 1890 and business was conducted thereafter solely by Isaac M. Pierson. Milton and Joseph Strahorn operated a carriage shop across the road in the same building that housed the blacksmith shop. Tragedy struck on Christmas day in 1903 when the wheel works was set afire, completely destroying the operation. It was written that a Toughkenamon firebug was responsible, and there is no further reference to the business.  
 
1123
Strahorn-Hutton-Evans Reconveyance
Strahorn-Hutton-Evans Reconveyance
Strahorn-Hutton-Evans was the livestock trading firm Robert formed late in his career. This document released a security interest in a herd of Texas cattle, and was executed by Robert Strahorn.
 
 
1124
Strayhorn Wheel & Spoke Works, Landenberg Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania
Strayhorn Wheel & Spoke Works, Landenberg Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania
Original location, on the East Branch of White Clay Creek, from a map dated 1847. 
 
1125
Strayhorns in the Civil War
Strayhorns in the Civil War
From the Lewisburg Chronicle, 4 Nov 1862 
 
1126
SunnySide in Critz, Virginia
SunnySide in Critz, Virginia
SunneySide is a 200+ acre farm in Critz, Virginia which John N. and Martha Penn Zentmeyer purchased in the 1855. They owned slaves, who were well cared for by all accounts. The farm continues to operate under Zentmeyer family ownership.
Image by Gary Zentmyer 
 
1127
Swarthmore College, 1940
Swarthmore College, 1940
Helen's entry in the yearbook 
 
1128
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1129
The Capture of Plymouth, North Carolina on 31 Oct 1864
The Capture of Plymouth, North Carolina on 31 Oct 1864
An engraving from Harper's Weekly, 24 Dec 1864. Caption reads 'Rebel magazine exploding' 
 
1130
The farm of Bernhard Zentmeyer b.1740 near Arendtsville, Pennsylvania
The farm of Bernhard Zentmeyer b.1740 near Arendtsville, Pennsylvania
Bernhard bought this farm from John Goudy in 1780 for cash and a series of bonds. He refused to pay off the bonds, because we could not obtain clear title to the property from Goudy. He apparently lost the farm at a sale for delinquent taxes on March 4, 1793.
Image by Gary Zentmyer  
 
1131
The Founders Stone in Hartford, Connecticut
The Founders Stone in Hartford, Connecticut
George Hubbard, one of the founders of Hartford 
 
1132
The Jacob Stutenroth Zentmyer family
The Jacob Stutenroth Zentmyer family
Image by Gary Zentmyer 
 
1133
The Miles and Jennie Zentmyer family
The Miles and Jennie Zentmyer family
Nona, George, Miles, Hermina, and Jennie Crewitt Zentmyer
Image by Gary Zentmyer
 
 
1134
The Strahorn House in North Plate, Nebraska
The Strahorn House in North Plate, Nebraska
Looks cold. 
 
1135
The USS Tacony, launched 7 May 1863.
The USS Tacony, launched 7 May 1863.
During the Civil War, Henry Brutsché served on the USS Tacony, a double-ended, side-wheel steamboat built by the Philadelphia Navy Yard. (Tacony was a suburb of Philadelphia) The Tacony had a length of 235 feet and a beam of 35 feet and a crew of 145. 
 
1136
The Vienna Buffet
The Vienna Buffet
Image from Lavander Los Angeles, Arcadia Publishing, 2011 
 
1137
Thomas Benton Limbocker
Thomas Benton Limbocker
Photo courtesy Donna Hancock 
 
1138
Thomas F. Strayhorn in Hartleton
Thomas F. Strayhorn in Hartleton
Biographical sketch indicating Thomas was working in Hartleton as of the summer of 1852, soon after his son Robert Edmund Strahorn was born. At that time, Thomas' father Samuel was living in Hartley Township, 1/4 mile west of Hartleton. Source: The Commemorative Biographical Record of Central Pennsylvania, Vol.1.
Image courtesy Gary Zentmyer 
 
1139
Thomas Foster Strahorn
Thomas Foster Strahorn
Found in the photo album of Arthur Thomas Strahorn, Thomas' grandson.
Image courtesy Gary Zentmyer 
 
1140
Thomas Strayhorn Taxes - 1874
Thomas Strayhorn Taxes - 1874
From Tax Assessor's personal record book 
 
1141
Thomas Strayhorn, Teacher
Thomas Strayhorn, Teacher
Another record from The Commemorative Biographical Record of Central Pennsylvania, Vol.1., corroborating his son Robert E. Strahorn's account.
Image courtesy Gary Zentmyer 
 
1142
Three kinds of saws at Strahorn's Mill
Three kinds of saws at Strahorn's Mill
As described above. 
 
1143
Tintype of Charles Elmore Cosby
Tintype of Charles Elmore Cosby
 
 
1144
Tintype of Jno. (John) Zentmyer
Tintype of Jno. (John) Zentmyer
Dated May 28, 1870, taken by Thos. Cummings, Lancaster PA 
 
1145
Tucson City Directory 1923
Tucson City Directory 1923
Wandyne De Cello a student at University of Arizona 
 
1146
Union Church Cemetery
Union Church Cemetery
Located in Hartleton, Union, Pennsylvania
Image by Gary Zentmyer 
 
1147
Union Pacific Employees Magazine, Feb 1886
Union Pacific Employees Magazine, Feb 1886
Placing the J.C. Strahorn family in Sterling Colorado, supporting Mary Strahorn's birth there the year before. 
 
1148
Union Station in Spokane
Union Station in Spokane
Robert financed and built Union Station on a site between the Spokane River and Trent Ave., now called Spokane Falls Blvd., completing construction in 1914. When it was torn down to make way for the Spokane World's Fair in 1974, demolition crews got more than they bargained for. The building was constructed to last for centuries, requiring the contractor to repeatedly ask for more money.  
 
1149
Viola Jo-Ann St. Myer Birth Certificate
Viola Jo-Ann St. Myer Birth Certificate
 
 
1150
W.C. Zentmyer snares intruder
W.C. Zentmyer snares intruder
Article in the Leavenworth Daily Times, 28 Nov 1875 
 

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